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Travel & Tourism . Tourist Guide to the Country

Vietnam Cuisine and Food



Cha Ca (Grilled minced fish):
A wide variety of fish can be used in this dish including sturgeon and tuna. Tuna is low in fat, has an exquisite flavour, and few bones. The bones are separated from the meat and put in saffron water to be later used in a sauce. The fish is placed in salt to marinate before being grilled.



Com (Grilled rice):
Grilled rice is mostly served in the fall. Grilled rice are found everywhere in Vietnam, but the best one is found in Vong village, 5 km from Hanoi. Villagers still use traditional secret recipes. They eat grilled rice with eggs, bananas, or sapodillas.



Banh Cuon (Rice flour steamed rolls):
Having banh cuon for breakfast is a great favourite among many Vietnamese. Banh cuon is made of rice flour. Thoroughly selected rice is soaked overnight, then ground with a stone mortar. Food preservatives are put into the flour to make the rice sheets softer and smoother.
A screen of cloth used to mold the rice sheets is fitted over the opening of a pot of boiling water. Flour is spread on the screen and covered with a lid. After a few minutes, a bamboo stick is used to strip the thin layer of flour off the screen. Then it is rolled up and sprinkled with fried onions.
Banh cuon is delicious when it is very thin, white, and sticky. It is even tastier when dipped in a sweet, sour, and spicy sauce.



Mien (Vermicelli made of cassava):
Mien threads are very long and tough, made from a kind of tuber plant called the cassava. When being served these long tiny flour threads, the threads are cut into smaller pieces.
Like rice vermicelli, this kind of cassava vermicelli is used to make several different dishes, the most popular being Mien Ga (chicken cassava vermicelli), Mien Bo (beef cassava vermicelli), and Mien Luon (eel cassava vermicelli).
Cassava vermicelli is also used for different dishes which is stirred in fat, such as Mien Xao Thit (vermicelli and pork stirred in fat), Mien Xao Long Ga (vermicelli and chicken tripe stirred in fat), and Mien Xao Cua Be (vermicelli and sea crab meat stirred in fat).



Banh Tom (Crisp shrimp pastry):
This dish is available almost everywhere in the country, but it is best to have it at the Nha Hang Ho Tay (Ho Tay Restaurant) on the banks of Truc Bach Lake, close to Ho Tay (West Lake).
While connoisseurs are awaiting the arrival of the hot fried shrimp pastry, they can enjoy the picturesque land and lakescapes offered by the tree-lined Thanh Nien Road, and the vast expanse of water from West Lake.



Nom (Salad):
This dish is a combination of a variety of fresh vegetables, usually used in salads in Western countries. The main ingredients of Nom includes grated pieces of turnip, cabbage, or papaya, and slices of cucumber with grated, boiled, lean pork.
Other auxiliary ingredients includes grated carrot, slices of hot chilly, and broken roasted groundnuts. These are used to make the dish more colourful. All are mixed thoroughly before being soaked in vinegar, sugar, garlic, hot chilly, and seasoned with salt.



Faifo Dainty (Da Nang):
The filling for dainty consists of lean pork and other condiments that are stirred fried. Then, the dainty is cut into finger-long pieces that are dried and grilled. Finally, the filling is put into the dainty. For a saltier taste, one can add fish sauce. Chicken meat cut in squares combined to small shrimps can also be added to the recipe.



Tom Chua(Hue sour shrimps):
When Hue natives living outside the city return to their homeland, they usually have sour shrimps. This dish can be prepared with every kind of shrimps. The recipe includes a number of steps that must be performed in a specific order.


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Acknowledgements: ASIATRAVELMART.COM








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