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Travel & Tourism . Tourist Guide to the Country

Jamaica Travel Requirements




Money Matters
US dollar can be used for commerce.
Banking hours are Mon-Thurs: 9.30 am - 2.00 pm,
Friday: 9.00 am to 4.00 pm
Credit cards and traveler's checks are widely accepted.

Clothing
Swimwear and shorts are fine for the beach and leisure wear around the island. Lightweight tropical clothing are the norm for days and nights.

Passports and Visas
All visitors (with the exception of those from USA, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and Canada) are required to hold a valid passport, but every visitor must have a photo ID and proof of citizenship (a driver’s licence is not enough). Sufficient funds and a ticket for an onward destination are required for entry into the country.

Australian, Canadian, U.K. and U.S. citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to six months. Citizens of other countries should call their local Jamaican Embassy or consulate office to determine their entry requirements.

Getting Around
Roads: Escorted half-and full-day tours, bicycles, rental cars and taxis are enjoyable ways of getting around. The roads along the winding north coast and in the mountain offer beautiful vistas, but driving on them can be a bit harrowing because of the blind curves and potholes. Cars are driven on the left-hand side of the road. A third of Jamaica's 17,000km (11,000 miles) of road is tarred, but outside the major towns the roads may be poorly maintained. The main coastal roads are excellent, but be forewarned that local drivers can be quite agressive. Car rental is fairly expensive and booking is advisable.

Buses: Buses are the most popular mode of transport but they are always crowded, the services slow and there’s no timetable. They are not recommended except to the budget-minded or well-seasoned traveler. The upside is that they’re inexpensive and offer a colorful glimpse of Jamaican life as well as being a great way to meet the locals. Connections between Kingston and Montego Bay and other major resorts are usually reliable.

Taxis: Licensed taxis can be recognised by the red Public Passenger Vehicle (PPV) plates they display. They can be flagged down on the street, or ordered by telephone. Taxi fares are charged by car rather than by person.

Trains: A diesel train runs between Kingston and Montego Bay and unveils an ever-changing panorama during the five-hour journey. The network covers nearly 340km (211 miles) of land and provides a comfortable opportunity to view the interior of the island.

Air Travel: International airports are situated in Kingston (Norman Manley Airports) and Montego Bay (Sir Donald Sangster Airport). Air Jamaica is the national airline and flies to most US cities and London. Many other international airlines fly to Jamaica. Tropical Airlines offers daily flights between major Jamaican cities. Trans Jamaica Airlines runs domestic flights to and from Kingston, Montego Bay, Port Antonio, Mandeville, Ocho Rios and Negril. Intra-island flights can be a quick way to zip between Montego Bay, Kingston, Negril, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio. Helicopters can also be chartered for scenic rides or for personalized tours although these can be quite pricey.

Ports: Cruise lines regularly call at the ports of Montego Bay and Ocho Rios, some sailing from North and Central American ports, others from the Mediterranean. Many cruises schedule Ocho Rios, Montego Bay and Port Antonio stops on their itineraries.

Electricity
110 volts/50 cycles is the standard. Some hotels use 220 volts.

 


 

Acknowledgements: ASIATRAVELMART.COM








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